Posts Tagged ‘art

20
Apr
10

“Speak softly, but carry a big can of paint.”

Wandering along the graffiti street on Moganshan Lu, I counted 4 wedding shoots, 3 model shoots, 2 motor bikers (preening and then roaring down the street) and 1 street artist.

His name is Tommy, an American responsible for a few masterpieces along the Moganshan Wall. I caught him just as he was finishing this giant blue … creature, fine-tuning shades and strokes, vibrancy and clarity.

The paint had barely dried when a pair of teenage girls wandered over to pose by it, flashing the ever ubiquitous V-sign next to pouting glossy lips.

Standing with his gear: a paint mask, step ladder, a wheelie bag filled with incriminating cans of sprays and a variety of nozzles, Tommy looked quite pleased with his deed for the day.

“We don’t do this to be famous,” he said at some point. 

It reminded me of what Banksy once said, “Speak softly, but carry a big can of paint.”

When he left, I stood at the same spot, capturing the flow of traffic past the wall. Some stared, most were oblivious. They’re too used to the color on that street. But isn’t that the beauty of it all.

“Imagine a city where graffiti wasn’t illegal, a city where everybody draw(s) whatever they liked. Where every street was awash(ed) with a million colours and little phrases. Where standing at a bus stop was never boring. A city that felt like a party where everyone was invited, not just the estate agents and barons of big business. Imagine a city like that and stop leaning against the wall – it’s wet. “ –  Banksy (Wall and Piece)

April 2010

Advertisements
18
Apr
10

The taxi rest stop

You could say that it’s one of the most colorful public toilets in Shanghai. That is if you can spot it amidst a long trail of graffiti winding along the curve of the road.

Located along Moganshan Lu (莫干山) by Shanghai’s art district, there is always a car or two pulled over on the side.  A man will emerge in mid-zip before climbing into his car.

It’s a popular spot for taxi drivers, even if the toilet shed may seem obscure to the careless passerby.

That afternoon, I found one of Shanghai’s latest fleet of Expo taxis, the Volkswagen Touran, parked by curb. Mr Xu was naturally puzzled to find me waiting for him when he emerged. Mid-zip, of course.

Tuns out, he has been driving this taxi for a few weeks and was proud of his new vehicle. “They pick drivers with the least complaints and the longest driving record,” he boasted.

On my first ride in the Touran, I learned that business was indeed much better than when he was driving his old Volkswagen Santana.

“Initially, nobody flagged me down. They didn’t realize I was actually a taxi!” he said, “But customers feel more secure in this car, and now everyone wants to ride in it!”

As I alighted to a cheery farewell and reminder to check all my belongings, I thought to myself that if the city had more new taxis, it would lift the spirits and inevitably improve the overall service of Shanghai’s taxi drivers.

Just then another taxi honked deafeningly as it swerved past me on a pedestrian crossing.

Maybe not.




All rights reserved

Please do not use content from this website without the author's permission.

Archives

Twitter Updates

June 2019
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
Advertisements